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Jason Westra

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Latest Articles from Jason Westra
When I started working with Java, I mentioned my move to a colleague of mine, a Microsoft devotee. He wasn't willing to move to the Java platform until supporting integrated development environments (IDEs) were as powerful and easy to use as Visual Basic. Although at the time nothing ...
This year's BEA eWorld 2003 show is the center of attention for BEA's product announcements and vision for the upcoming year, exciting stuff indeed. The theme for this year's conference is 'convergence.' You'll notice that this theme is likewise ingrained in the articles in this issue...
My house has bars on its windows. Yes, bars. I am sure at some point in the life of the 110-year-old house, they served a functional purpose. Surely, if I were a robber, I'd be more motivated to look elsewhere for my next DVD player to steal, but the bars are more decorative, just orna...
It is the dawn of a new season as BEA WebLogic Developer's Journal moves into its second year. What better way to start the new year than with a focus issue on Web services? And it's not too early to do so; as we move closer to BEA's eWorld 2003 developer conference in March, I'm sure ...
I learned about WebLogic Workshop in December of 2001 while interviewing BEA CTO Scott Dietzen. At the time, it was code-named Cajun and, according to Scott, the tool would revolutionize Web services and J2EE development. Cajun has since been renamed BEA WebLogic Workshop and become an...
My friends arrived in town (Denver, CO - U.S.) last weekend and to their surprise, I told them I had four football (American football, that is...) tickets to the Broncos game on Sunday. That morning, we proceeded to tailgate, drink, and eat merrily; and then we entered the new 'Mile Hi...
I recently upgraded a small WebLogic 6.1 application to WebLogic 7.0. The process was really quite simple. I attribute this smooth transition to the application's standard use of J2EE components and to WLS 7.0's backwards compatibility! I really only had to do a few configuration chang...
As good as product documentation gets, there is always room for more code samples, deployment descriptor samples, and tips on how to take advantage of undocumented tools. While integrating WebLogic Server 6.1 as a product offering for my company's hosting platform, I needed examples fo...
There's no question about it - J2EE applications are tough, burly pieces of software. Often they require numerous servers, communicate over various protocols, and run on software from various vendors. Let's examine a simple J2EE application in which everything, including the...
I have two newsworthy items to talk about this month. One concerns the application server market; the other pertains to a newly announced partnership in the wireless space. Each tidbit dates from July, but as editorial schedules run a bit behind the times, I'll relay them to you n...
If you asked me what the theme for this month's WLDJ is, I'd have to say 'performance and scalability.' I was once asked, 'What is the most scalable way to build a J2EE application?' 'Let's just find the holy grail while we're at it!' I thought. The question is quite common among J2EE ...
This month WLDJ focuses on third-party integration. We cover products that integrate at different levels of the BEA e-business platform, and have guest editorials from vendors who have successfully partnered with BEA to provide closely integrated solutions on top of WebLogic Server. Sp...
'Migration,' in terms of J2EE, generally means good things for a project or application. It means bug fixes from a previous version, new features to make your life easier (whether you are a developer or a system administrator), and often it means performance, fault-tolerance, and scala...
The BEA eWorld conference was, in many ways, the same as every other conference I've attended. In other ways, it was quite different. The conference was held in the San Diego Convention Center, California, February 23-27, 2002. When I arrived, the hotel manager asked if I'd take a sm...
Web services. Who needs them? You will. Indeed, I have. As a proof of concept for a wireless company, I wrote an application that allowed users to manage a fantasy football team from any WAP-enabled handheld. Users could set their lineup for the big day, or add and drop players from ...
Welcome to the eWorld issue of BEA WebLogic Developers Journal! Each year WebLogic developers and managers make a pilgrimage to eWorld to meet with vendors hawking wares in the exhibit hall, to listen to BEA visionaries in jam-packed sessions, and perhaps most of all, to see what new, ...
In the mid 1990s, I worked with an application development environment (ADE) called Forte - essentially, PowerBuilder on steroids. It allowed for scalable, distributed applications to be developed, debugged, and deployed easily within a single environment. The technology was really coo...
Welcome to the inaugural issue of BEA WebLogic Developer's Journal (WLDJ)! Anyone who has not been living under a rock for the past two years has seen J2EE (Java 2 Enterprise Edition) become the de facto standard for developing component-based, server-side applications. As a leadin...
I never bothered with roadmaps until I was of driving age and began to take trips on my own. Rock climbing drew me to my first trips and involved driving to remote areas of the U.S. It didn't take long to realize that a single wrong turn onto a road in the middle of nowhere meant hours...
I never bothered with roadmaps until I was of driving age and began to take trips on my own. Rock climbing drew me to my first trips and involved driving to remote areas of the U.S. It didn't take long to realize that a single wrong turn onto a road in the middle of nowhere meant hours...
In the March issue of JDJ (Vol. 6, issue 3) we discussed the basics behind J2EE security, including coverage of role-based security for both the Web and EJB tiers. In Part 2, we provide an example of implementing J2EE security in the WebLogic Server.
This month's article is the first in a two-part series on J2EE security. In Part 1 we'll discuss basic J2EE security. Part 2 will provide you with a model to set up and deploy a functioning security-enabled application. Resident J2EE security guru, Chris Siemback, has been kind enough ...
This month in EJB Home I'll show you how to build a message-driven bean. Knowledge of this EJB will enhance your toolkit for developing asynchronous Enterprise Java applications - whether they're mission-critical or not.
Several patterns exist for generating primary keys for your EJB application. This month I'll provide a pattern for generating PKs that's scalable, generic, and portable.
This month's EJB Home was originally a presentation at JC2 in Santa Clara, California, in September. For those of you who couldn't make the session, I thought it would be beneficial to transcribe it here and relay an experience in the successful implementation of an EJB application usi...
JDJ: Paul, what do you think about wireless and the state of the industry in five years? Chambers: There's certainly going to be a lot of change. The telecommunications industry is really going to go through a revolution over the next five years. Two markets we really need to look at ...
Many of you have been developing EJB applications since the 1.0 version of the specification. In the EJB 1.1 specification the approach toward EJB exception handling has changed slightly regarding the exceptions and transaction management responsibilities between bean providers and con...
JDJ: Paul, I'd like you to give us some technology trends and talk a little bit about GemStone's role in the wireless market. Tell us some of the key players in that market right now.
The buzz at JavaOne 2000, in my opinion, was definitely the solidification of Java in the wireless market. As radio host for SYS-CON Radio at JavaOne, I had the pleasure of interviewing CEOs and CTOs of leading application server vendors. Many of them focused, not on J2EE support, but...
I'd like this month to offer some editorial thoughts on the e-commerce market for EJB solutions - but first let me just say 'Happy Birthday' to the EJB Home column and briefly recap the articles that have appeared here over the past year.…
Persistence Software, Inc., recently released the latest version of its EJB server, PowerTier 6. It's a little different from your run-of-the-mill EJB servers, though. This JavaOne 2000 special-edition issue of EJB Home will enlighten you about PowerPage, a hot feature that will put Po...
Discussion groups have recently been abuzz with talk of "coarse-grained entity beans" - a slight misnomer deriving, I suspect, from the addition of mandatory entity beans in EJB 1.1. This month I'll examine the finer points of the Enterprise JavaBeans specification regarding ...
As much as I hate to admit it, Microsoft was a pioneer in server-side component architectures. Its COM/DCOM (Distributed Component Object Model) server-side component model for building and deploying components in the Microsoft Transaction Server (MTS) environment already had applicati...
When I started working with Java, I mentioned my move to a colleague of mine, a Microsoft devotee. He wasn't willing to move to the Java platform until supporting integrated development environments (IDEs) were as powerful and easy to use as Visual Basic. Although at the time nothing ...
I expect great things from Enterprise JavaBeans this year, one of which is dominating the e-business front as the component model of choice for server-side application development. E-business is multifaceted, encompassing e-commerce (monetary transactions over the Internet), business-t...
Often we think of security as a burden, a time-consuming process that requires us to jump through hoops just to get through a doorway or view a Web page on the company intranet. My first real appreciation for (or frustration with) security came a number of years ago. I was a PowerBuild...
I was asked to stick my neck out and write on the future of Enterprise JavaBeans in year 2000. Just so you know, I was one credit away from a minor in the classics (you know, Greek mythology, ancient Rome and Egypt). However, since I didn't major in this field, nor even minor in it, do...
Last month, in EJB Home, I covered the business advantage of Enterprise JavaBeans' portability from a high level. First I discussed the various types of portability. Then I covered (1) the portability goals the creators of EJB had in mind when developing the specification and (2) how y...
What's all this hype about portability? Portability has been a hot topic since Java's arrival just a few years ago, so I'm going to devote some space toward understanding portability issues centered around the Enterprise JavaBeans architecture and development. This month I'll discuss t...
To those of you familiar with Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB), deployment descriptors are nothing new. Essentially, a deployment descriptor's purpose is to collect declarative information that can be modified during deployment of an enterprise bean. Deployment descriptors are a key element ...